Alzheimer Drug Reduces Amyloid Plaques In Phase 2 Trial, Creates Excitement
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Alzheimer Drug Reduces Amyloid Plaques In Phase 2 Trial, Creates Excitement

Aug 02 2018

Alzheimer Drug Reduces Amyloid Plaques In Phase 2 Trial, Creates Excitement

A new Alzheimer’s drug, called BAN2401 reduced amyloid plaques in Alzheimer’s patients during Phase 2 clinical trials. Partnering drug manufacturers, Biogen and Eisai announced this exciting news last week. The long losing streak in finding an  Alzheimer’s drug cure may be over.

 

alzheimer drug

 

This Phase 2 clinical trial which lasted 18 months, showed BAN240 1 reducing significant amounts of amyloid plaque (a hallmark of the disease) and also slowed disease progression by 30%.

 

Alzheimer Drug: BAN2401 Study Results

The phase 2 clinical trial results for drug BAN2401 are impressive. In 81 percent of the group taking the highest dose, the number of amyloid plaques  was at pre- dementia levels.

In addition, BAN2401 improved cognitive function on memory tests and other measures. If the results continue in phase 3, BAN2401 would be the first drug to reverse cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s.

 

Alzheimer Drug: Where Do We Go From Here?

Heather Snyder, for the Alzheimer’s Association, says the real proof for BAN2401 will be in the next phase of testing. “The larger phase three study will have enough people to really answer… what is the impact on cognition… and over what period of time.”

 

New drug research is focusing on the early stage of the disease, as it has a significant impact on the activities of daily living.

 

Speeding research on BAN2401 and other drugs and discovering other potential breakthroughs, depends on more people volunteering for clinical trials. To learn more, go to alz.org\trialmatch, a website set up by the Alzheimer’s Association to help match patients with ongoing trials.

 

Phase 3 clinical trials require a large number of patients so that data can be scientifically valid.

 

Indeed, phase 3 trials are the rubicon for drugs as FDA standards are strict. In fact, 85% of drugs that do successfully pass are pretty much assured of coming to market. Unfortunately, the drug graveyard for Alzheimer’s drugs that never get past phase 2 trials is filled to capacity.

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Barry G
barry@skycaremedia.com

Barry graduated from City University of New York and holds a Ph.D. in Physiological Psychology.

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